Keith House

2041 South St

1800

Architectural Style

Federal

Significance

Architecture

Use Type

Single Family Dwelling House

Neighborhood

Massachusetts Historical Commission Report

Architectural Significance

This house appears to have been built in two stages—the rear portion with the single dormer window may date to c. 1790-1810. The portion closest to South St. with its Doric corner board and return eaves appears to date to the 1840's or 50's. It may have been enlarged by its mid-19th c. owner—Vassel Keith, master builder. He was probably responsible for the c. 1870's encircling verandah.

Historical Significance

This house was built c. 1790-1810 for a branch of Bridgewater's Keith family. Situated at the extreme southern portion of the Town at Titicut/Sturtevante Corner, this house's rural surroundings remain relatively unspoiled. Keiths have long been associated with this part of town—as early as 1740's the Keiths operated an iron foundry at Sturtevant's Corner. It is said that the Keiths developed a revolutionary process for casting and boring cannon. It is said that Paul Revere came to study this new method. The 1830 map shows this house labeled S. Keith. By the 1850's Vassel Keith, master builder, lived here. His son, Roland Manning Keith (1847-1935) was born in this house. He was a selectman from 1911-1929 and served in the state legislature. By the late 1840's an H. Walsh owned this property. By the early 1900's Charles Goodenough, farmer owned this house. It is interesting to note that an ice house was located on the pond to the west of this house during the late 19th c.